June 16, 2015 – Orlando Business Journal

Hang Ten! Here’s what Skyplex’s surf park could look like

6/16/2015 at 2:56pm EDT
By Richard Bilbao, Orlando Business Journal

Now, we already know Skyplex on International Drive is set to open with a surf park as part of its growing portfolio. But what will it look like?

A rendering of Sky Surf - The Surf Park at Skyplex

A rendering of Sky Surf – The Surf Park at Skyplex

Well, the Sky Surf park, to be developed by Wallack Holdings, will be designed by American Wave Machines, a Solana Beach, Calif.-based firm that has similar surf parks in places like New York, South Dakota, New Hampshire, Canada, Peru, Russia and Sweden.

The surf park will be built atop a 10-story parking garage next to the 350 room hotel.

The surf park will be built atop a 10-story parking garage next to the 350 room hotel.

The surf park is expected to come with three pools, including one that can be used by professional surfers for training or competitions. Renderings of the park — check those out above — show the wave pools separated by pavilions, beach chairs and tables that most likely will be used for food and beverage service.

Read the full article on The Orlando Business Journal

June 15, 2015 – Forbes

Grand New Century Resort in Hainan, China to Feature SurfStream

6/15/2015 at 11:41PM
By Jane Ho, Forbes Contributor

New Century Tourism Group, China’s biggest non-state operator of four-stars-or-above hotels owned by Chen Miaolin, schedules to open its Qizibay Grand New Century Resort on the coast of Hainan, one of South China’s most frequented holiday destinations, this October.

The 5-star resort has 600 rooms and 1,500 dining seats, and also houses a water park including a 20-meter-long, 7-meter-wide surfing pool that can create 1-meter-tall waves – the first one in China and Southeast Asia to have installed a deep water standing wave machine.

Hainan New Century Hotel SurfStream Surfing

“Unlike other forms of wave machines using 30-year old technology, a deep water standing wave machine provides an authentic surfing experience outside of the ocean, with revolutionary technology that lets surfers use real surfboards with fins,” says Robert Reynolds, COO of the equipment’s supplier and the world’s leading wave technology company American Wave Machines in the U.S.

“Our technology creates waves that provide a longer ride than in even the largest wave pools on the planet at a fraction of the size and cost,” adds Reynolds.

The Resort’s general manager Jin Taizhi points out it is safer and easier to surf in a pool than in the ocean. He says: “A novice surfer can have the same fun without having to go though stringent training programs.”

The Resort will also host festivals of the local Li and Hui ethnic groups. “Chinese tourists are looking for more variety in the way they spend their vacations,” Jin avers, “And with this we can provide them with elements of a backpacker’s experience.”

Read the full story on Forbes.com here

May 1, 2015 – CNBC

Retail’s new trick: Using surfing to catch more than a wave

5/1/2015 at 12:14pm
By Krystina Gustafson, Content Editor and Retail Reporter at CNBC

These big-box department stores are some of the names that come to mind when picturing a typical anchor tenant at the mall. One company, however, is hoping to change that.

American Wave Machines CNBC May 2015

American Wave Machines’ surfing technology will be installed at three shopping centers by the end of 2016.

Read the full article on CNBC.com

As mall traffic continues its steady decline—dropping 10 percent as of Saturday for the month of April—American Wave Machines is challenging the idea that anchor tenants need to be stores at all.

An anchor has been seen as a store that is so popular that it is a shopping center’s main draw. But what if shoppers come to the mall for another reason?

Robert Reynolds, chief operating officer of the company that designs and manufactures surf pools, said American Wave Machines’ technology possesses all the same qualities a traditional anchor tenant is supposed to have, minus the old-fashioned box.

For one, Reynolds said his company’s surf pools encourage consumers to visit a mall, often on a repeat basis. For another, they increase the amount of time people spend on the property. The pools also drive food and beverage sales incrementally higher, as visitors post up to watch surfers master the waves—or wipe out.

Oasis Surf Crowd at DIX30 Mall

“For malls that are more challenged because of the marketplace or as the economies have changed, they’re looking at this as something they could put across their portfolio,” Reynolds said.

American Wave Machines, whose pools have also been installed at surf parks, water parks and resorts around the world, first got its feet wet at retail in 2011, when it launched at the open-air Sur Plaza Boulevard shopping center south of Lima, Peru. Nearly four years later, the company opened its second retail location at Oasis Surf, a facility inside Quartier DIX30 in Brossard, Quebec, where thousands of surfers have paid 30 Canadian dollars ($25) for a 30-minute chance to ride the waves.

But Reynolds said American Wave’s presence at shopping centers is just getting started. Its third retail pool is set to launch at New Jersey’s American Dream megamall, a project whose much-delayed opening is slated for the second half of 2016. Reynolds said the company is also in “advanced conversations” with larger mall owners, who are interested in including the technology across their portfolios.

American Wave’s expansion at shopping centers comes at a time when mall operators are looking for innovative ways to bring shoppers to their properties. As a growing portion of retail sales are conducted online, malls and retailers are striving to deliver to shoppers experiences that they can’t replicate on their computers, smartphones and tablets.

Over the holidays, for instance, Taubman Centers brought Disney’s “Frozen” to life at 10 malls, by opening a themed ice palace. An innovative property in Las Vegas, dubbed the Grand Bazaar Shops, had each of its 120 tenants devise their own way of bringing interactivity to the space. Alex and Ani, for example, lets shoppers try on jewelry using virtual reality.

Virginia Morris, vice president of global consumer and innovation strategy at Daymon Worldwide, said that although these sorts of interactive initiatives should boost traffic and sales, that’s not all they boil down to.

“It’s more about the buzz and the talk value of the experience that you’re getting,” she said.

Though Reynolds declined to give specifics on the traffic boosts the properties received after opening their surf pools, he did say that there are times when there’s a three- to four-week wait to book a 30-minute session riding the artificial waves. He added that the average consumer dwell time on the properties increased between 15 and 20 minutes.

In addition to increasing the amount of time spent per visit, the attraction encourages visitors to keep coming back.

“You get repeat customers because they want to be better at it,” Reynolds said.

Claude Coudry, founder of Oasis Surf (the venue where American Wave Machines’ technology is used at DIX30) added that the attraction has brought new clientele to the center.

Though installation costs vary depending on the location and size of the pool, Reynolds said the average for a commercial unit is about $3 million. The clientele spans from experienced surfers who bring their own boards, to “aspirational” surfers who are trying to learn.

Lines Out the Door at the First Surf Park in Canada and U.S.

Until now, the only thing limiting the 3 million-plus active surfers in North America from getting more waves is geography.  The two stand-alone indoor surf parks in Montreal and New Hampshire that just opened for business in 2014 are breaking down the geographical boundaries.

Oasis Surf evening crowd enjoying the action
Nightlife at Oasis Surf in Montreal, Quebec

These surf parks are demonstrating that not only is the surfing great, but the business is great. With upwards of 200 surfers paying to surf in 30 minute sessions daily, business is booming. Click here to read the Business NH Magazine’s take on out-of-ocean surfing.

Click here to view a 30-second clip of the Oasis Surf experience

“New Hampshire and Montreal’s SurfStreams are paving the way for urban surfing.” –Bruce McFarland – President & Founder of American Wave Machines

Oasis Surf owner Claude Coudry and friends ringing in the New Year

 

November 24, 2014 – We Win

American Wave Machines Prevails in Infringement Lawsuit
US District Court Ruling Dismisses Case

American Wave Machines announces their unequivocal victory in a patent infringement case brought by Wave Loch and Light Wave.  For more in depth coverage click here for a Legal Newsline article and click here for the PR Newswire release.

“This is a major victory for the company.  Our mission to build world class surf facilities in every suitable market in the world continues.”  Bruce McFarland, President and Founder, American Wave Machines.

SurfStream® at Boulevard de Asia, Peru

August 17, 2014 – ESA Makes History at Surf’s Up NH

August 17th will go down in the history books as the world’s first sanctioned indoor surf contest. Surf’s Up in Nashua, New Hampshire, the home of the largest SurfStream on the planet, was host to many of the Eastern Surfing Association’s top competitors including several ESA All Stars.

Kainalu Nichols ESA Contest Winner at Surfs Up NH
Contest Results & Division Winners
Menehune (11 & Under)
  1. Robbie Goodwin
  2. Quinn Battagliese
  3. Elliot Anderson

Boys (12-14)

  1. Braeden Logue
  2. Tristan Hamilton
  3. Perran Trentalange

Jr. Men (15-17)

  1. Kai Nichols
  2. Lars Hamilton
  3. Griffin Brunette

Open (All Ages)

  1. Kai Nichols
  2. Lars Hamilton
  3. Weiland Anderson
A big thanks to all the sponsors for making it a great event
  
About the ESA  
ESA is the largest amateur surfing association in the world. Their family oriented
programs promote a healthy and active lifestyle. It is not uncommon to find two or three generations of the same family involved as members of the ESA, and actively competing in ESA programs. Two of the original founders of the ESA, Cecil Lear and David Reese, are still active in the association forty years later.Eleven time world professional surfing champion Kelly Slater and former world professional womens surfing champion Lisa Anderson both learned their competitive skills through the Eastern Surfing Association.

August 12, 2014 – Endless Summer Resort on Oahu

The Greene Waters Group of Bridge Real Estate announced plans today for a unique hospitality experience at The Endless Summer Resort. The 400 unit resort will be centered around a four-acre PerfectSwell® surf pool that creates an infinite variety of customizable waves using technology created by American Wave Machines. KITV Honolulu covered the story.

Endless Summer Surf Resort Coming to Oahu in 2017 | American Wave Machines | Surf Park Central

“American Wave Machines has advanced technology to a point where they make consistent  waves with an infinite variety,” said Surf City Hui, LLC co-founder Chad Waters.  “At The Endless Summer Resort, we will be able to create a surfing experience that removes the fear for beginners and in some cases, exceeds the real thing for expert surfers

Our overriding design philosophy was to create surf, the dynamics of the ocean at the beach, not just individual waves.  We’ve accomplished that with PerfectSwell®” said Bruce McFarland, Founder and President of American Wave Machines, “The iconic concept put forth by Surf City HUI aligns with our vision for premium surf destinations.”

Surf City Hui will be interviewing potential operators and contractors during the next few months, and anticipate the resort opening by the summer of 2017. The developer is asking for public input on the project by completing a short survey, which includes an informational video.

 

June 13, 2014 – Red Bull

Watch the latest Who is JOB Episode at RedBull.com

 JOB and the Body Glove team pack up the RV and take New England by storm. See the action on the SurfStream® at Surf’s Up NH here. (Surfing starts at 6:30 in the video)

Jamie O'Brien Boosting at Surfs Up NH
JOB Boosting on the SurfStream® at Surf’s Up NH

“About to go get shacked indoors, we’re fired up!” – Jamie O’Brien, Pro Surfer  

 

Check out the video below currently featured on RedBull.com: 

Who is JOB Episode 8

 

Kalani Chapman SurfStream NH
Kalani Chapman – North Shore Power Hack on the SurfStream®

“So sick we got to surf a stationary wave with fins. Thanks for showing the team such a great time @americanwavemachines” – Kalani Chapman — Pro Surfer, Body Glove Team Rider 

 

JOB Party Wave Surfs Up NH
JOB Party Wave

January 16, 2014- ESPN X Games

American Wave Machines

 Read the full article and watch the interview on ESPN X Games site here

Recently, the Surf Industry Manufacturers Association (SIMA) and the International Surfing Association (ISA) have been vocal in their push for artificial waves, seeing it as a tool to either grow the surf market or get the sport into the Olympics. Thanks to a recent surge in wave pool construction around the world, including one in Nashua, N.H., some believe the pool is the future of surfing.

Now, Nashua isn’t necessarily Surf City, U.S.A., but that’s part of the point. According to SIMA, wave pools have the potential to grow the industry in areas not anywhere close to a beach break.

Soon after the first-ever Surf Park Summit last fall in Laguna Beach, Calif., where wave pools were discussed at length, I headed to New Hampshire to check out American Wave Machines’ newest pool. On the brink of winter, it was cold, dark and not exactly bubbling over with aloha.

I ended up at Surf’s Up, located next to a CVS Pharmacy, and the wave pool shares a building with an indoor skydiving facility. All I could think was heaven help the sport I’ve pursed my whole life. This wasn’t surfing.

Todd Holland Power Turn Surfs Up Nashua NH

“All the aggression we were use to seeing Todd [Holland] surf with came out on that little wave and we instantly knew that this was not like anything we’d ridden in the past,” described Rob Kelly.

 Read the full article and watch the interview on ESPN X Games site here

Then a group of local kids from the Eastern Surfing Association (ESA) showed up. The pool’s engineer pulled out an iPad, opened an app, and proceeded to create a perfect three-foot standing wave. The kids’ faces lit up. They sprung to life, pulling on wetsuits and waxing boards. As far as they were concerned it was eight-foot and offshore. With the swipe of a finger their surf lives had changed.

“There’s five months of the year that it’s pretty much too cold for these kids to surf,” said one of the parents. “This is huge, it opens up their entire world.”

When you look at a facility like Surf’s Up through the eyes of a 13-year-old, the perspective changes completely.

“If you see it as something to augment the surfing experience there’s a lot you can do with it,” described Todd Holland, a former top tier ASP competitor who now runs a surf school in Florida.

The Surf’s Up pool is capable of producing a number of different kinds of waves. There’s a foamy whitewater wave that is fun for playing around on a boogie board. There’s a one-foot beginner wave that’s ideal for teaching people to surf. There’s also a standing river wave, like you’d see on the Eisbach River in Munich, Germany. And finally, there’s the premier wave that can serve up a three-foot tube. Depending on how the pool operators have it configured, that wave can either be a left or a right.

“It’s not a huge pool, but there’s so much you can do with it,” continued Holland. “It’s a huge training tool for these ESA kids that don’t get to surf for long periods of time. Now they can get wet, work on technique and still feel like they’re surfing. But you can also change it up and teach a whole group of beginners. It’s very dynamic.”

No matter what SIMA or the ISA say, the fact is that wave pools are only going to be viable if they are profitable. That means appealing to a broad audience. The “core” surfer makes up such a small part of the actual surf industry that money has to flow in through other channels to keep a pool open, which is wear a beginner wave and foamie for boogie boarding come in.

“We’re trying to design our systems so that they can be used in a variety of ways, creating a whole lot of different wave-riding experiences,” says John Luff of American Wave Machines. “When we crank it up you can ride a normal surfboard with fins and get barreled and do airs, but it also caters to surfers of every level and ability. You don’t need to be a pro to enjoy it, that was never the idea.”

Up next, American Wave Machines will be tackling a more ambitious project in Sochi, Russia. Construction is currently on hold until after the Winter Olympics, but they’re looking a building a pool that mimics ocean swells and waves. They also have a project in the works in New Jersey, which is being funded by the same people that built the “Mall of America.”

After a weekend in Nashua I can’t tell you I’m totally sold on wave pools as a substitute for surfing, but it’s obvious that the future is here. Kids don’t care if there’s sand or sea gulls as long as they’re having fun, and the Surf’s Up waves are fun.

 

December 20, 2013- Quartz

American Wave Machines PerfectSwell Surf Park

QUARTZ | 12-20-2013

By: Todd Woody at Quartz

Bruce McFarland’s San Diego office is just a skateboard ride from some of California’s prime surf spots. And right now, McFarland is gazing at the perfect wave—a glassy, barreling wall of water. But it’s breaking inside his building, and McFarland, an engineer and surfer, is controlling the wave with an iPad.

Sure, the wave is only three inches tall and is contained in a pint-sized pool built by McFarland’s company, American Wave Machines. But two surf parks deploying the company’s PerfectSwell technology are set to open in Russia and New Jersey, generating four- to six-foot (1.2 to 1.8 meter) waves at the push of a button. “We want to create waves so that anyone, anywhere can surf,” says McFarland.

Bringing surfing to the landlocked masses could be the biggest change to hit the sport since Hawaii’s Duke Kahanamoku taught Californians how to ride the waves a century ago. American Wave Machines is just one of half a dozen companies developing artificial wave technology, including a Los Angeles startup founded by 11-time surfing world champion Kelly Slater.

With a mix of hope and hype, the $7 billion surf industry is embracing wave parks as way to grow a flat-lining business. Kids in Kansas and Qatar could become real surfers, not just boardshorts-wearing wannabes. Pro surfing executives, meanwhile, are pushing surf parks as predictable, television-friendly venues to stage competitions as they lobby to make surfing an Olympic sport. “Surf parks will create an entire new generation of aspirational surfers,” says Jess Ponting, director of the Center for Surf Research at San Diego State University. “These new surfers will not just buy for fashion but for equipment as well, and not just in the US but in Russia, China and Europe.

Surfing has always been as much a way of life as a sport, the exclusive domain of a coastal wave tribe with its own rites and rituals. (Disclosure: I’m one of them.) Now with dozens of surf parks under development worldwide, surfing is about to get Disneyfied—buy a ticket, stand in line, and go for a ride.

In the ocean, no two waves are alike. Each one is formed by constantly changing conditions—winds, tides, swell, sandbars. Even if you’re lucky enough to live on the coast near surf breaks, there’s no guarantee there will be rideable waves on any given hour or day. That unpredictability can make honing one’s surfing skills a time-consuming process, demanding a commitment bordering on obsession.

That’s also problematic for pro surfing. Small surf and long lulls between sets of waves do not make for exciting television, so it’s hard to attract the viewers that advertisers and sponsors covet. Contests last for days, stopping and starting as ocean conditions dictate. They cannot be scheduled into two-hour, TV-friendly time slots. The window for holding the annual Mavericks big wave competition in northern California, for instance, runs from November until April and the contest is called on 48 hours notice when huge waves—30-foot plus—appear. “There’s no way a surf contest will ever be on ESPN Live,” says Matt Reilly, director of marketing at Surf Park Central, a website that covers the nascent artificial wave industry.
A surf park, on the other hand, can ideally churn out one identical wave after another. Replicating Mother Nature is not so easy, though. Most wave parks built over the past 20 years offer a so-called standing wave: A sheet of water is pumped into a pool and over a barrier to create a continuous breaking wave that stays in place. Riders can balance on a surfboard and maneuver to some degree. But the wave does not move and there’s no wave face to ride across. It’s more like surfing a waterfall.
The Holy Grail is a wave that mimics the physics of an ocean wave, moving through the pool, rising up and breaking to the right or left so surfers can catch it and ride up and down the face or propel themselves off the lip to perform aerial turns.

The future of surfing: No ocean required

 

Screen Shot 2013-11-20 at 7.20.10 PM

REUTERS   |  11-22-2013

By: Richard Valdmanis on Reuters.com

(Reuters) – A surfer drops down the face of a crashing swell, crouches low and stalls his board into the tube, achieving the sport’s ultimate goal of a ride inside the barrel.

But instead of being on a sunlit beach in Hawaii or southern California, this surfer is inside a glass-and-concrete building in New Hampshire – at America’s newest surf park, an hour’s drive from the Atlantic.

“Part of our mission is to bring surfing everywhere, including where there isn’t an ocean,” said Bruce McFarland, president of American Wave Machines.

The company’s SurfStream wave system is being used at the Surfs Up New Hampshire park in Nashua, which is set to open in December.

Surf parks have been around for decades, but a surge in the sport’s appeal and rapid advances in wave-making technology have triggered new construction in unlikely places such as South Dakota, Quebec, Sweden and Russia.

Using proprietary designs meant to emulate waves formed in nature, companies like American Wave Machines, Weber Wave Pools, Waveloch and others are racing to bring the ocean sport to the landlocked masses.

Fernando Aguerre, head of the International Surfing Association (ISA), said their efforts could be a big boost for surfing and businesses built around it.

“Surf parks will give the opportunity to learn to ride waves in a safe way to millions of people around the world,” he explained, adding it could also help ISA to make surfing part of the Olympic Games.

“Without man-made surfing waves, our Olympic surfing dream would be just that – a dream,” he said, adding that reliable, identical waves, virtually impossible to find in nature, are needed to insure fair judging in Olympic competition.

SURFING INLAND

Once seen as a fringe sport, surfing now has around 35 million enthusiasts worldwide. It is a roughly $6 billion retail industry in the United States, according to the Surf Industry Manufacturers Association.

“The industry is doing a good job selling surfing as a lifestyle. It is fun. It influences culture, music, fashion, all that. It is imbedded. But it is hard for anybody who doesn’t live near the ocean to do,” said McFarland.

Surfers, desperate for a good wave, have sought out wind swells on the Great Lakes and tried surfing on river rapids and in the wake of passing barges on the Houston Ship Channel in Texas.

“There is definitely a huge demand,” said Matt Reilly of Surf Park Central, a website that tracks global surf park construction. “The speed of growth that you’re seeing is the result of improvements in technology and increases in efficiencies.”

The most commonly used surf park wave designs are modeled on standing river waves, where thousands of gallons of water are propelled against an immobile object to create a stationary curl.

At a recent Surfs Up New Hampshire test run, a handful of professional surfers – including Todd Holland, who was once ranked No. 8 in the world – carved up different types and sizes of standing waves in front of a panel of engineers and photographers.

“This is great,” said Holland. “Once you get going down the line, it feels just like racing a big section.”

Research has also been done on designs more closely related to waves at the world’s finest ocean spots, where a moving swell is produced that breaks when it hits shallow water along an artificial reef or sandbar.

Although less so than in the past, the cost of building an artificial wave system is still substantial. A standing wave system like the one in New Hampshire costs about $3 million to$6 million, while a traveling, or ocean wave, system is much more expensive.

Despite the surf park industry’s efforts to mimic real surf, McFarland, whose company is now also building a traveling wave park in Russia using his PerfectSwell technology, said artificial waves will always have their limits.

“We’re not trying to compete with the ocean, or replace it in any way,” he said. “But this is fun, and I think it is good for the sport and for people.”

(Writing by Richard Valdmanis; editing by Patricia Reaney and Gunna Dickson)

Discovery Channel Goes Surfing

Lucas Cochran, host of Daily Planet on the Discovery Channel Canada, got an exclusive behind-the-scenes look at our SurfStream® SS6032 system being installed at the Surfs Up surf park in Nashua, New Hampshire.

The TV crew spent the day with us to capture an under-the-hood view of our technology at the largest stationary wave surfing system in the world. — Check out Discovery Channel’s online segment of American Wave Machines.

Lucas interviewed our founder, Bruce McFarland, and received his first surfing lesson from AWM team member John Luff. We had a blast showing him how our technology creates real waves and the TV host learned to surf by the end of the day!

 

SurfStream Standing Wave Barrel Jared Veltsos NH

Jared Veltsos – Nashua, NH Local Surfer & Zapstix Team Rider

 

 

Surf Park Market is Here | Authentic Surf Outside the Ocean

PerfectSwell® - Authentic Surfing Experiences Beyond the Ocean

The Surf Park market is here. John Luff, business development staff at AWM was interviewed about the surf park market and sustainable tourism in a compelling article in Transworld Business seen here.  AWM continues to lead the way in the development of surfing beyond the ocean with existing installations around the globe and planned openings in New HampshireMontrealSouth Dakota, and Sochi, Russia — site of the 2014 Winter Olympics.

“Surf Parks are the key to making surfing a mainstream, commercially sustainable sport and to promoting surfing as an iconic lifestyle that transcends all nationalities and cultures.” – John Luff

AWM’s PerfectSwell® and SurfStream® technologies allow for authentic recreational and advanced surfing experiences. This is made possible by AWM’s patented wave systems designed and engineered for the best user experience and the best long term owner experience.

 

SurfStream® – The ideal small footprint solution for  versatile & endless wave riding on real surfboards.

Very large scale surf pools using computer optimized PerfectSwell® technologies that simulate an authentic ocean environment are  currently in production. AWM’s PerfectSwell® wave generation systems offer practical solutions for resorts and waterparks such as in Sochi as well as surf parks specifying waves up to 12′ or more.  Stay tuned for these openings and watch for several new locations to be announced soon.

AWM looks forward to working with both large scale and small scale surf park projects around the globe and meeting specifications with the most cost effective and world class wave generation systems on the market.
About American Wave Machines, Inc.

American Wave Machines, Inc. (AWM) designs, engineers, manufactures and sells world class wave pools, wave systems and surf centers. Founded in 2000 by California surfer Bruce McFarland, the company is committed to delivering authentic surfing experiences in a safe and controlled environment. SurfStream® is the world’s first standing wave machine that delivers a stationary surfing experience (on real surfboards) scalable to various spaces. PerfectSwell® is the first air-powered system to create an authentic surfing experience through natural-like ocean waves. From the Caribbean to Sweden, American Wave Machines has developed more than 15 small and large-scale installations exclusively for surf parks, waterparks, resorts, malls and research institutions. www.AmericanWaveMachines.com

American Wave Machines Commissions Latest PerfectSwell

Continuous Surf – Any Shape and Size

PerfectSwell Barrel View May 2013 | Greetings from the Barrel
 

SOLANA BEACH, CALIF. (June 3, 2013) – American Wave Machines (AWM), the technology leader in out of ocean surf recently completed installation and commissioning of the latest PerfectSwell® wave generating invention in East Durham, New York.

Adding to the PerfectSwell® suite of innovations, including the patented reflecting wave generator, the new software based invention creates surf by sequenced control of multiple wave generating chambers. Virtually any wave shape and direction can be generated continuously including point breaks, peaks, beach breaks, barrels, and multiple rider waves.  The recently patented invention is applicable to all pneumatic systems including linear and circular wave pools.

Additional patent pending innovations include a mobile wave control application designed to run on mobile devices.  The mobile app will enable operators, coaches, and surfers to call and control waves and personalized playlists.  A media option allows photo and video capture of the surf session within the app.

We’re stoked our customers have bigger and better waves in their pools than they thought possible. The capabilities of this system exceeded our predictions” said Bruce McFarland, founder and president of AWM. “Not only does this demonstrate the scalability of PerfectSwell®, it demonstrates wave quality and quantity necessary for successful surf parks..

The PerfectSwell® systems currently under construction are focused on surfing and standard wave pool recreation and are engineered for waves up to 8 feet. Still larger wave systems are within the technical capability.
 

About American Wave Machines, Inc.

American Wave Machines, Inc. (AWM) designs, engineers, manufactures and sells world class wave pools, wave systems and surf centers. Founded in 2001 by California surfer Bruce McFarland, the company is committed to delivering authentic surfing experiences in a safe and controlled environment. SurfStream® is the world’s first standing wave machine that delivers a stationary surfing experience (on real surfboards) scalable to various spaces. PerfectSwell® is the first air-powered system to create an authentic surfing experience through natural-like ocean waves. From the Caribbean to Sweden, American Wave Machines has developed more than 15 small and large-scale installations exclusively for surf parks, waterparks, resorts, malls and research institutions. www.americanwavemachines.com